Marijuana or CBD Oil?

Do You Need to Get High to Treat Your Symptoms?

Marijuana or CBD Oil?

As more states legalized medical marijuana in last November’s election, you can imagine the confusion people experience as they weigh their options. Marijuana has been used for many years to treat medical conditions ranging from chronic migraines, seizures, and muscle disorders to name just a few. It helps to relieve side effects caused from chemotherapy treatment and other harsh therapies, but comes at a cost. Patients who use marijuana experience a high that inhibits function--prevents safe driving, childcare, and more. What if you could benefit from the marijuana plant without the high that comes with smoking or ingesting it?

CBD Oil

Cannabidiol (CBD) oil is extracted from the flowers and buds of the marijuana or hemp plant and does not contain the THC which causes a “high” when marijuana is smoked or ingested. Unlike recreational or medical marijuana, CBD oil has been widely used and under-regulated for several years, allowing people to experiment with treatments for a variety of ailments. The main differences between CBD and THC? CBD oil is medical, and THC is recreational. People may use THC for a temporary euphoric high, but CBD is not psychoactive--and is generally used in a medicinal application.

  • CBD oil relieves pain.

Marijuana has been used for pain relief for generations, yet scientists have now identified the pain reliever in the plant is in fact CBD. Working much like a medication, CBD effects the body’s endocannabinoid receptors, reducing inflammation and affecting neurotransmitters. Chronic pain that is untouched by man made drugs may be relieved using CBD oil.

  • CBD oil reduces mental and mood symptoms.

While many common SSRIs used to treat anxiety and depression come with very serious side effects and can even worsen symptoms, CBD oil is used effectively, with very little side effects, and is non habit-forming.

  • CBD oil relieves chronic and terminal symptoms.

Many treatments and therapies associated for chronic and terminal illnesses such as cancer treatment come with serious side effects. CBD oil may help reduce symptoms such as nausea and vomiting caused from therapy, as well as anxiety and depression caused from chronic illness.

  • CBD oil may improve skin.

Many animal studies have found that CBD oil helped to improve acne symptoms, prevent frequent outbreaks, and reduced inflammation. This natural alternative can replace the antibiotics many depend on for prolonged treatments of acne.

  • CBD oil improves memory and function.

There is some evidence supporting CBD oil in treating mental disorders that come with serious symptoms, including schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, and to improve memory in patients with Alzheimer's and dementia. It may also be used during smoke cessation or substance abuse treatments to reduce dependence on more serious medications.

Is CBD Oil for You?

You should never try a new treatment for a diagnosed condition of ailment without discussing it with your physician first. Even natural remedies can cause side effects and may interact with important medications prescribed for your safety and health. When you visit your doctor, bring your questions and a list of brands you’re considering.

Ask your doctor:

What do you think of CBD oil?

What medications might I stop if CBD oil treats my symptoms?

How long would you give an experimental remedy to show results?

What type of supplements and remedies have you recommended over the years?

Why? Why not?

No matter the pros and cons of CBD oil, the availability, or your doctor’s opinion, you also need to consider the legality. While many states don’t consider it a serious charge, it is still illegal in many states to sell or possess CBD oil. Know the law, know your body, and know your options.

 

Marijuana or CBD Oil?

Meet the Author:

Rachel Ashworth


Rachel Ashworth is originally from the Midwest, her expertise is writing research-based articles about health and wellness. Specific interests include mental health and addiction. Rachel has written on a wide range of topics including parenting, fitness, health, fire safety, home maintenance, medical insurance, and dental care. She spends her time writing, volunteering with her church and community, and teaching her children.


Rachel Ashworth is originally from the Midwest, her expertise is writing research-based articles about health and wellness. Specific interests include mental health and addiction. Rachel has written on a wide range of topics including parenting, fitness, health, fire safety, home maintenance, medical insurance, and dental care. She spends her time writing, volunteering with her church and community, and teaching her children.