Treat Acne Without Breaking the Bank

Find Out How To Get Great Skin For Less

Treat Acne Without Breaking the Bank

Acne is the most common skin condition in America and approximately 85 percent of people between 12 and 24 have it. Scarring on the face, back, shoulders, and arms can lead to serious self image and anxiety issues throughout life, so getting acne treatment right is important. You don’t have to spend a fortune on over-the-counter medications. In fact, many acne treatments are covered under your prescription plan and will contribute to your annual deductible and cost less than over-the-counter treatments.

Get Pre-Authorized

Regardless of your age, you may still get acne. Dermatologists still see acne in adult and aging patients! It is not just an adolescent condition. When you’re outside of the common age for diagnosis, insurance companies may deny your claim for a specific condition, like acne. To make sure your medication is covered, ask your doctor to help you with a pre-authorization.

Ask for a Referral

In some cases, your insurance may require that you see a dermatologist. A primary care physician can prescribe acne medications, but your insurance provider may require that a specialist first makes a diagnosis. Your doctor should be able to refer you to a dermatologist that can sign off on your treatment and make the preauthorization process easier, and help insure your med is covered.

Do Your Research

It may be that your insurance policy won’t cover the medication itself, but it will cover some other aspect of treatment or diagnosis. For instance, some insurance plans will cover the consultation at a clinic that specializes in acne treatment, but may not cover the prescription itself. Some in-office treatments may be covered, like cortisone shots, but other fast-acting in-office therapies may not be covered. Make sure you talk to your insurance company prior to your appointment so that you will fully understand what treatments are and aren’t covered.

Consider Other Cost-Cutting

You can utilize discounts on prescription meds just like over-the-counter ones. Drug manufacturer’s offer discounts just like every other marketable product. There are other ways to cut costs as well.

  • Ask for samples

    Pharmaceutical reps often leave samples at clinics that are free to patients. Ask your physician if you can try a sample before spending the money on the medication.

  • Ask for a generic drug

    Generic drugs are FDA approved and equivalent to major name brand drugs. Your pharmacy most likely has a discount plan for generic drugs. Most cost $4 for a 30 day supply, or $10 for a 90 day supply.

  • Consider an oral medication

    There are oral treatments for acne that can help fight the bacteria that causes outbreaks. Ask your physician if you can use an oral medication instead of a topical one that is less likely to be approved by insurance.

  • Ask about pill splitting

    If your doctor prescribes an oral medication, you may be able to purchase a medication of twice the dosage and split the pills to save up to 50 percent on cost. Confirm the safety of splitting your pills with your pharmacist before attempting, as some are not appropriate for splitting.

Acne can be bothersome. It can affect an individual in more ways than one, and it doesn’t have to affect your wallet too. Treat acne without breaking the bank by making sure you stay within your insurance policy and cost-cutting.

Treat Acne Without Breaking the Bank

Meet the Author:

Rachel Ashworth


Rachel Ashworth is originally from the Midwest, her expertise is writing research-based articles about health and wellness. Specific interests include mental health and addiction. Rachel has written on a wide range of topics including parenting, fitness, health, fire safety, home maintenance, medical insurance, and dental care. She spends her time writing, volunteering with her church and community, and teaching her children.


Rachel Ashworth is originally from the Midwest, her expertise is writing research-based articles about health and wellness. Specific interests include mental health and addiction. Rachel has written on a wide range of topics including parenting, fitness, health, fire safety, home maintenance, medical insurance, and dental care. She spends her time writing, volunteering with her church and community, and teaching her children.